Fluvial and Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs

Modern Gilbert-Type delta prograding in a glacial lake in the Karakoram of northern Pakistan. Details of deltaic reservoir properties, their motifs on wireline logs, and seismic facies are covered in this course

The course is designed for geoscientists and reservoir engineers who primarily focus on ‘shallow marine’ successions, especially those involved in building or updating geomodels. Whether your task involves a simple well-correlation across tidal systems, or the input of fluvial channel dimensions into a geomodel this course will benefit you in several ways.

Besides presenting standard facies models, quantitative modelling equations are presented in exercises. By the end of the course participants will be able to predict reservoir geometries, dimensions, and N:G of fluvial and paralic sedimentary systems and look for stratigraphic traps. Given below is a detailed outline:

Day 1. Introduction to the course and sedimentary structures in fluvial to shallow marine successions.

Fluvial systems: classification of rivers, architectural elements, prolific global fluvial reservoirs, exercise on calculating channel dimensions and geometry using core or borehole image log data.

Day 2. Deltaic systems: Wave, Tidal, Fluvial processes, deltas through sea-level cycles, architecture, fan-deltas, gilbert-type deltas, shelf-margin deltas and supply of sand into the basin and reservoir prediction using clinoform trajectory analysis on seismic lines.

Day 3. Incised Valley Systems and Tidal Systems: Distribution of reservoirs and their vertical stacking patterns, exercise focuses on describing shallow marine core.

Day 4. Barrier Islands, Shorefaces, Spits and Washovers: How to differentiate between each? Effects of stacking patterns on Kv and Kh, N:G changes, exercise on well correlation.

Day 5. Workshop on the identification of Gross Depositional Environments in well-logs.

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